Self-regulation

Effective self-regulation can be recognized as an important key to success in life[1][12][17]. People with self-control are more effective[2][12]. They have better grades in school[13][16]. They have better relationships with family and friends[14], less conflict and more cohesion[15]. They are better at understanding others and score higher on empathy. They show better psychological adjustment[18], including fewer psychological problems, fewer signs of serious psychopathology[18], and higher self-esteem[2]. Supervisors who score higher in self-control are rated more favorably (e.g., as fairer) by their subordinates[3]. People with high self-control make better relationship partners, especially because they are better able to adapt to partners[4][5][6]. Prudent people live longer[8] are more positive[9] are less likely to have antisocial personality disorder[10][11]. Deficient self-control on the other hand is the single most important key to understanding criminality[7].

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I do not agree with this statement. I somewhat agree. This may sometimes be representative. I agree with this statement. It describes my situation very well.
I resist temptations that are overall bad for me in the long run.
I am able to hold off and not react on impulse.
I monitor and evaluate my own behaviour.
I have goals and values that helps me decide if I need to moderate myself.
I avoid temptatations by being good at planning.
I seek to make it more fun to do the boring things I have to do.
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      Research
      • [1] Mischel, W., & Ayduk, O. (2004). Willpower in a cognitive-affective processing system: The dynamics of delay of gratification. In R. F. Baumeister & K. D. Vohs (Eds.), Handbook of self-regulation (pp. 99-129). New York: Guilford Press. View
      • [2] Tangney, J. P., Baumeister, R. F., & Boone, A. L. (2004). High self-control predicts good adjustment, less pathology, better grades, and interpersonal success. Journal of Personality, 72, 271-322.
      • [3] Cox, S. P. (2000). Leader character: A model of personality and moral development. Doctoral dissertation, University of Tulsa.
      • [4] Finkel, E. J., & Campbell, W. K. (2001). Self-control and accommodation in close relationships: An interdependence analysis. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 81, 263-277.
      • [5] Tangney, J. P., Baumeister, R. F., & Boone, A. L. (2004). High self-control predicts good adjustment, less pathology, better grades, and interpersonal success. Journal of Personality, 72, 271-322.
      • [6] Vohs, K. D. & Baumeister, R.F. (2004). Depletion of self-regulatory resources makes people selfish. Unpublished manuscript, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
      • [7] Gottfredson, M. R., & Hirschi, T. (1990). A general theory of crime. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
      • [8] Friedman, H. S., Tucker, J. S., Schwartz, J. E., Tomlinson-Keasey, C., Martin, L. R., Wingard, D. L., et al. (1995). Psychosocial and behavioral predictors of longevity: The aging and death of the "Termites." American Psychologist, 50, 69-78.
      • [9] Marshall, G. N., Wortman, C. B., Vickers, R. R., Kusulas, J. W., & Hervig, L. K. (1994). The five-factor model of personality as a framework for personalityhealth research. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 67, 278-286.
      • [10] Costa, P. T., & McCrae, R. R. (1990). Personality disorders and the five-factor model of personality. Journal of Personality Disorders, 4, 362-371.
      • [11] Wiggins, J. S., & Pincus, A. (1989). Conceptions of personality disorders and dimensions of personality. Psychological Assessment: A Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 1, 305-316.
      • [12] Barrick, M. R., & Mount, M. K. (1991). The Big Five personality dimensions and job performance: A meta-analysis. Personnel Psychology, 44, 1-26.
      • [13] Wolfe, R. N., & Johnson, S. D. (1995). Personality as a predictor of college performance. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 55, 177-185.
      • [14] Finkel, E. J., & Campbell, W. K. (2001). Self-control and accommodation in close relationships:
      • An interdependence analysis. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 81, 263-277.
      • [15] Vohs, K. D., & Baumeister, R. F. (2011). Handbook of Self Regulation (Second ed., Vol. 2). New York,NY: The Guilford Press.
      • [16] Duckworth, A.L., Gendler, T.S. & Gross, J.J. (2014). Self-control in school-age children. Educational Psychologist, 49, 199-217.
      • [17] Moffitt, T., et al. (2011). A gradient of childhood self-control predicts health, wealth, and public safety. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108, 2693-2698.
      • [18] Tangney, J., Baumeister, R., & Boone, A.L. (2004). High self-control predicts good adjustment, less pathology, better grades, and interpersonal success. Journal of Personality, 72, 271-324.
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